I conduct research on several aspects of experimental plant eco-physiology under controlled laboratory conditions as well as in the field. I work with submerged aquatic plants in freshwater systems as well as seagrasses and macroalgae inhabiting seawater or brackish waters. More recently, I have expanded my research interests to also include flood tolerance of terrestrial wetland plants or even dryland plants.

Much of my research is carried out in collaboration with international colleagues in Europe, Australia or Japan - see international collaborations  for more details on some of the exciting projects.

Ecology of lobelia lakes

The lobelia lake is the most common type of lake in Scandinavia but we only have few in Denmark. These lakes support a unique vegetation with many exciting adaptations to life in carbonate-poor waters. More…

Eco-physiology of seagrasses

Globally, seagrasses colonize vast areas in the shallow coastal zone where they play essential roles as ecosystem engineers. In order to protect and also restored seagrass systems, more knowledge on their eco-physiology is required. More…


Flood tolerance of wetland plants

Wetland plants experience flood events on a regular basis and they possess unexplored traits that enable them to thrive in environments where floods occur on a regular basis or perhaps only once during their life cycle. More…

Flood tolerance of crops
Climate changes have already resulted in an increasing number of floods. Hence, there is a pertinent need to develop crops that are more flood tolerant in order to sustain the global food production. More…


Climate changes and brownification

Brownification of freshwaters is a growing problem in most temperate areas of the world. We do not yet know the mechanisms behind but these are likely related to climate changes, changes in land use and other anthropogenic activities. More…

Global and regional plant distribution

Precipitation, temperature and nutrients control the global distribution of terrestrial plants, but aquatic plants seem to follow different patterns. Water chemistry is important and novel analyses reveal exciting patterns of aquatic plant distribution. More…